About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 10
CSPAN 9
CNNW 8
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBCW 2
FBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
LINKTV 1
MSNBC 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for -- are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down in 2008. -- like in 2008. it is of
together to stop us from becoming greece. >> yes. >> man up, barack obama. strong words. >> he has a chance to be an historic president. what makes us greece? it's not because the tax code is at 35% versus 39.6. what's going to make this country greece, like every other western nation, retiring at 10,000 a day in terms of baby boomer, three workers for every retiree, in 20 years we'll have two. medicare and social security are about $30 trillion underfunded. if you did what tip o'neill and ronald reagan chose to do, reform entitlements, we become the most dominant place on the planet pretty quickly. so what i would plead with the president to do is use this mandate. redo revenue, which we should. but what keeps us from becoming the country we want to be and damns the future generations is entitlement and spending. when i was 21, my mom died, when i was 22 my dad died. if it wasn't for social security survivor benefits, my sister would have never gone to college. social security is going to fail. when i was 22 we needed the 300 and something bucks we got a month. i'm 57, i have no kids, i co
corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a so
from becoming greece. no more borrowing without addressing why we're in debt to begin with. that's where the real chance for change occurs, at the debt ceiling debate. >> we're joined now by ralph sill voe. it's christmas eve. do you have some plans to do? >> it's an austerity christmas, actually. just a couple friends getting together and a couple of friends getting together and having a nice meal. >> it is not an austerity christmas. >> it actually is. we haven't had the greatest year. everything we hoped would happen. we thought this economy was going to turn around at the summer period. >> ralph, if you take a look at the stock market concerns, the dax is up 20%. >> there will be plenty of alcohol to forget. >> do you think we're going to manage to see some type of a resolution on the fiscal cliff? we're seeing a lot of finger pointing now and hearing from both sides saying it's in the other side's interest to delay these negotiations. >> i've had conversations with people in new york and working on trade floors. what i've been told by them is there is a huge number of meetin
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
of the year of crisis with a steady hand. she has stuck to her goals in 2012 -- to save the euro and greece without compromising germany's financial stability. >> how alive is the concept of charity? we bring you an example from mexico. >> first, some of the stories making news. japan has a new prime minister, voted in by the lower house of parliament earlier today. his liberal democratic party won by a landslide in polls earlier this month. he has vowed to introduce aggressive monetary policies and says he wants to revise japan's pacifist constitution. >> china has launched the world's longest high-speed rail route. the line between cities is almost 2,900 kilometers long. trains travel an average speed of 300 kilometers per hour, cutting travel time in half to just eight hours. >> floods in malaysia have forced more than 13,000 people to flee their homes. the floods have hit several states of the country's east coast. one woman died after slipping into a swollen river, and forecasters are expecting more rain to fall. >> china's leading producer of rare earth is attempting to shut down some
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
of ancient rome and greece were thought to ennoble the minds that contemplated them. turner recorded their beauty-- the vestiges of power in ruin, history frozen in atmospheric splendor, a lost paradise still tinged by myth. he could capture that beauty like no one else which earned the praise of his friend the painter thomas lawrence. (reader) "the subtle harmony of this atmosphere, that wraps everything in its own milky sweetness... can only be rendered, according to my belief, by the beauty of his tones." (narrator) turner first saw the seductive beauty of venice in paintings by the 18th century venetian artist canaletto, a favorite of itish collectors. turner's venice from the porch of madonna della salute was designed to appeal to that market. juliet and her nurse, on the other hand, was a breathtaking work of fiction. turner transported shakespeare's characters from verona-- and set them in the lower right-hand corner of a composition that vibrated with the decadent revels of venice at carnival time. rendered in luminous tones, figures and fireworks dissolve in the gossamer atm
of the nobles should govern the affairs of men. she was looking back to greece and rome and the founding to figure out to figure out how much of the divided opinion as natural, how much is on natural and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have in his answer was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations. we all know them. if i could only be with my books and my farm and my family and at peace and rest of monticello. well, you know the road was open, she could have gone in new york, philadelphia, richmond, paris, london, holland. he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it because it has a young man he entered into what he called the board election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way that few historical defense i think have grabbed any generation or any man. i think that he thought of the revolution actually almost as an organic thing almost as a child than as an adopted or created by this group of men who would preserve it and make it and nur
of diplomacy helped broker a cease-fire. number three, in europe greece was the problem child that spent too much, save nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership didn't stop constant violent protests, staged by those facing loss of jobs, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. europe's leaders including the new french president committed to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? number two. the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its use of air power. >> one of the questions most asked in 2012, was how much longer can this man hold on to power? assad was under intense pressure to step down. but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition. civilians caught in the crossfire. more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> this is, yet, another bread line. >> the opposition fights on making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of additional support for the international community. number one -- she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shocked. she
and greece. it is not a pretty scenario. >> tell me this what happens when we judge up against it? >> everybody starts wondering when we are going to raise the debt ceiling. there's a debate because they don't like to. then you have all of wall street looking at this wondering if we will be able to pay our bills. you remember what happened last time around the market sold off 2,000 points over the 2 month period. it was dramatic and hurt people's 401 k's. if you can't pay your bills you get a downgrade. >> again. >> it's not going to be good news. you know what happens you can't borrow as much money. >> that's what happens to me. >> it costs you more to borrow. all of us coming together it will be -- it could be we would be watching none of this would come to a surprise fell off the market every single day. they know what's happening. they know what's going on. it's not a surprise but nobody likes to see it. >> when they raise the debt ceiling is that to pay off debt already accrued. >> the money is already out the door. that has been spent. that is money we spend on other things.
and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. it can be uplifting when the times are good. greece won it in 2005, but is it appropriate for the greeks to pump millions or billions in? i think austerity is one reason. but i think also the tone is another. is it right to be celebrating in spandex when your people are out on the streets? >> reporter: looking at some of the countries' economic scorecards, it's hardly surprising. greece is aware that taking part could be an issue. especially as its economy is expected to drop to minus 4.5% next year. portugal, meanwhile, is expected to shrink 1.8%. and poland and slovakia have decided to spend their money on other projects. that's despite projecting positive growth for 2013. ♪ it reportedly costs around $160,000 to take part. and if you win, some countries spend big to host the lavish event. for some national broadcasters, this is reason enough to pull out. >> the cost of staging has been mounting in recent years. russia put on
seem like an emerging market economy here. >> are we greece? >> our politics are becoming as dysfunctional as greece. i mean, we're not greece, but if you look at what businessmen say about why they're not investing in the u.s., they will often give dysfunctional politics in washington as the top answer. it's not even tax rates that people are concerned about. it's just getting a deal, getting people aligned. >> we're going to roll some tape, but i just wanted to ask you quickly, last week your sort of advice to republicans was don't cave, compromise. >> right. >> so this week, given what we've seen so far, we see these one-on-one negotiations taking place, what do you think the best strategy on the part of the republicans is? >> don't cave. compromise. you're not going to get 35%. you're just not going to. you're not going to. the economy will go up in flames. you're just not going to get 35%. the president needs to understand he's not going to get 39.6%. if i were sitting in the house and the president asked me to go four, five percentage points up on tax rates right now
everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded against the germans, and in short order the french collapsed against belgium. they did it over a week -- at first, they thought they would get 10,000 or 12,000 men out. then anything that could float was sent over there. the got more than 200,000 british troops out. i found it interesting that several thousand fren
heard it compared to the fiscal crisis in greece, 63% had heard it. in that number 36% had read a lot about it or heard a lot about it. do they believe a solution is likely? our numbers different from other poles. americans are more optic. first of all see what they think, unlikely 73% back in november when we asked about the debt program would there be an agreement, 73% saying that, now 44%. the number you want to think is 4% to 44% thinks a solution is likely. who thinks it's likely, that's interesting and driving this number. he can break it down by party. look at what we find, republicans 52-42, independents, i come back here, there we go, independents 47-32 and it's really what you see here 60% of democrats think it's unlikely. i just want to show you again when we get to the issue of 48% to 44% believing it's likely, it's mostly different by democrats. we it break it down further into what people expect, what kind of solutions work? think of this chart as the politician's guide to solving the fiscal cliff and remaining in office. the net percent acceptable minus the percent that
. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval
. google is flying from south to north. so i think they're kind of mingling right now in greece. so in santorini. this is his dashboard. you can see where he is. there's a lot of games. kids having a ball with it. it shows you where santa is. he's leaving his presence as he moves. he's moving from africa north. so now they kind of just bypassed each other in greece. and now google is now in finland where the other guy is. or similar santa was earlier. they're kind of meeting in the middle. just around the equator. >> here's the thing, we just don't want a midair santa crash. that would be the worst case scenario. thank you so much, alexandria, in an age of e-mails and tweets, here we go. it's nice to know that a letter can still be a powerful tool. it also helps if you have a powerful role model. that would be 9-year-old gabriella miller. she got strangers from around the world to write letters to santa. that out pouring will bring some joy for severely ill children like gabriella herself. now, our affiliate has the story. >> we have a mountain of letters here. >> reporter: chris' c
very little in terms of not becoming greece. it's a victory for the president and i hope we have the courage of our convictions to fight for what we believe as republicans. >> peter, what the senator is saying is this doesn't really solve the problem of the debt we're building up. >> no, it doesn't. we have all heard taxing high income individuals more would only raise 5% of the deficit. another statistics that will break your eyes. if we raised everybody's income tax by 50%, we'd likely only cut the deficit in half. that should explain to everyone why it is imperative we finally do something about rapidly escalating entitlement cost but the president refuses to come to the table. nothing is fixed in my mind more than speaker boehner saying i've offered you 800 billion in additional revenue. what do i get in return? and the president said nothing. you also counted he won the election. i have got news, whether he won the election or not,let stats about the budget are neutral and nonpartisan and mr. boehner's republicans won an election too. he was elected president, not prime mini
can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because they cannot afford it. host: democratic caller, new jersey. caller: i am a retired attorney colonel. i've done a lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about entitlements, and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. it has no part today in a problem. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund, the huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 where people stopped paying taxes and started drawing welfare, and number three, we have the tax cuts, the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which have severely reduced the amount of revenue. the tax burden on americans from the federal government today is an 80-year low. we cannot fund the government with the revenues and loss in jobs that we have. host: cbo has done a study. including all parts of the tax cuts, and you have sequest
at the currency and isolation. >> steven, stay there. selling 1.3 billion euros in three-month t-bills for greece. the bid to cover ratio, 1.73%. this allocation did include a 30% noncompetitive tranche. in other central bank news, it's been quite a busy day on that front. the central bank says use the repo rate holing at this level in the coming year warning the recovery is taking its toll on the economy. >>> and in australia, the rba eps's decision to lower rates appears to find a close one. central banks included keeping the rates on hold. still, policymakers were more concerned by more than expected slowdown in mining and investment. and japan's prime minister elect has told the country's central bank to consider adopt ago 2% inflation target. shinzo abe made the claim today. the bank is expected to cut borrowing costs at its rate setting meeting this week. steven, in light of all of this news, kind of goes back to the point that we were just making, that are a lot of central banks trying to use interest rates effectively as a way to depress the value of their currency even though we're seein
rate increases, maybe not at 250, but upper rate americans. we accomplished little in not become greece. this won't affect the debt situation. it will be a political victory for the president and i hope we have the courage of what we believe is republicans. hats off to the president, he won. >> reporter: democrats would acknowledge this deal, if there is a deal is smaller in scope and won't do as much for reducing the deficit long term as both sides hoped. the real focus is to focus the most harm on people. not having everyone's taxes going up. there's a lot more involved in it. we have been focused on taxes. we hope to have something that gives a sense of are they close? will they get there? within a couple hours. >> a couple hours. we'll check in with you again. thank you so much. i want to bring in a fiscal policy reporter, laura montgomery as well as political writer for "the new york times," john harwood. you heard kelly mention some republicans weren't feeling the president's interview on "meet the press" this morning. they took issue with it. from that interview and what you saw
. but it's not working incr greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. host: f
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
to the internet, we met a few. 16-year-old cristos lives in greece and has taken more than five different computer courses. >> i now know what i want to study at university and what i want to do in my life. >> reporter: 22-year-old from kazakhstan got a job with twitter after taking artificial intelligence. >> you can gain all the top knowledge from a top university. >> reporter: in northern virginia, 14-year-old sophia and her mother, laura, have completed a variety of classes. >> you can sit on your couch in your pjs and learn about any topic that interests you. >> reporter: do you have a sense of what grade you would give yourself? >> probably an a minus. i'm a little rusty. i don't know about you. >> i would give myself an a plus. >> reporter: back at the university of pennsylvania, poetry professor says opening his class has changed his whole feeling about teaching. >> i like it because i get to teach people all over the world. they're self selective. because they're not getting credit at the moment and it's free, they come because they're interested in my topic, which is modern poetry. >> re
seven early movers for you, high profits, but less money coming in in the packaging company, greece it's called. what's with the stock? it's up about 4%. the rare earth mining company molycorp ousted its chief executive officer. it's down a little. profits disappointing seismic equipment maker geospace, down and dupont buying back a billion dollars worth of its stock and it's up just a little. health insurer aetna expects higher profits next year, it's up. and microsoft has wrapped up production of its new surface tablet and it, too, moving higher in the early going, i own some microsoft stock. netflix says it needs many more subscribers to be profitable. nonetheless it's up. dow industrials are up 37. and news from berkshire hathaway coming in and it's-- okay, they've bought back 9200 of their class a shares from the estate of one of their shareholders. so they bought back 9200 shares there, the class a stock. that was the news, part of the news on which the halting of berkshire hathaway was based. okay? when they start trading again, nell pretty soon, we'll get a quote for you on tha
. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. -- ekle
of becoming greece. >> the president's aides not surprisingly quickly rejected the plan which republicans say would bring in $800 billion in higher tax revenue without raising rates. white house communications director said, quote, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill. press secretary jay carney said mr. obama is determined to phase out the bush administration tax cuts for families making more than $250,000 a year. >> he will not sign a bill that extends those tax rates for the top 2%. we can't afford it. it is not a wise economic policy or wise fiscal policy. and it would defeat the principle of balance that he has embraced. >> so with less than a month to go before the deadline, we've now had an offer and a counteroffer, but arguably, no real attempt at compromise. democrats say republicans haven't detailed how they would increase tax revenue and they haven't offered enough of it and republicans say democrats haven't agreed to serious entitlement program cuts. steve, gretchen, brian? >> steve: thank you very much, live from the north
the united states in the 1930's and is characterized greece today. the program of 375 billion pounds is 0.25 of an annual nominal gdp flow. a lot of money. bront money is now expanding at over 5% and we will see the impact of that on demand later in 2013. the second action the bank has taken to provide a breathing space before these broad macroeconomic factors feedthrough is to introduce what we call a funding for lending scheme. a special scheme started on the first of august under which the bank of england, with the garden -- guarantee of the governor because this is a cause i-fiscal action, would provide four-year financing for banks to enable them to increase lending to the real economy or at the least, to contract lending to the real economy by less than they would otherwise have done. we will lend to banks according to how much they are expanding their own net lending to the real economy and the more they expand their net lending, the lower the interest rate which will charge on loans to them. there is a powerful financial incentive built into this funding for lending scheme to pers
of its own. 7% like -- remember, the business is still majority in spain, italy, portugal, greece, et cetera. over 50% of sales. there 7% like for like. margins rising. it is a special company. >> taking a big -- are they taking a chunk of market share, as well? >> absolutely. i think it goes back to the strengths of its model. i think more than anyone else they listen to the consumer. this is fast fashion taken to the extreme. there's something new in the stores every two weeks. there's a reason to keep going every two weeks. they get feedback from the store managers quickly on what's working, what's not working. go back to the production people, say we need this more, we need less of this. >> the supply chain must be -- where are they making this stuff? how are they able to get it into the store so quick three is. >> about half of their production is in spain, portugal, and morocco. that's the secret really. unlike h&m et cetera who gave everything to the far east, inditex is doing quite a lot locally. that is the key challenge for them. as they get bigger and bigger, can they remai
. >> gretchen: we look at what is happening in greece where they can not print their own money and they have a massive spending problem. you have rioting in the street. so in a way, in america, since you can print the money, it's just kicking the can down the road, right? >> i think people realize intuitively, this can't work forever. the biggest buyer now of our long-term bonds is the federal reserve. in other words, the government itself is printing money to loan to the government. this can only work for some period of time before the rest of the world says, we no longer trust the u.s. dollar. we don't give it the credibility we used to. >> brian: people outside our windows don't trust the u.s. dollar. that's the scary part. >> people have been excited about the rise in home prices. it's just the long-term, this is not how you grow an economy. this is not how you thrive. >> gretchen: all right. you heard it from james freeman, with the "wall street journal." thanks. >> thanks. >> brian: 19 minutes after the hour. >> gretchen: no love for jesus? a jesus look alike tossed right out of a spor
greece faced multi-year recession and slowdown, unemployment at over 25%, youth unemployment over 50%. what we saw was the recession expanding. spain, italy, the uk, all found austerity taking its toll even more as unemployment continued to rise in some of those countries. even the large country, the economic powerhouse germany found its slelf slowing down. the root cause of it all was the inability of the european governments to come to policies to get growth started again. towards the middle and end of the year they did, but the tale was style there. very much austerity again and again. perhaps if there was only one change that took place as we moved into the fall and into the winter. it was the realization that most of these countries could take no more austerity. social welfare having been cut, health care cut, unemployment, growth virtually nonexistent. now the talk is not of more austerity, but how to get growth started again across the contine continent. suzanne. >> thank you, richard. >>> christmas, of course, is a time of giving, but there are many struggling families in bos
it do? >> that, that what would happen is, we were turn into europe. we all see it. we see greece, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-t
leverage to turn the country around, prevent it from becoming greece and save social security and medicare. >> as a practical matter no matter what congress and the white house do before the end of the year it is already too late for most employers to accurately withhold taxes from the january pay checks unless there is no change so workers will feel immediately for example that 2% hike in social security taxes in those first january pay checks. carl? >> i hate to work in an accounts payable department over the next couple weeks, hampton. it is going to be kind of nutty. thanks so much. hampton pearson in washington. procrastinators across the country are hitting the malls today to take advantage of the last-minute sales. find out which retailers are going to benefit the most. but first, rick santelli is working on something for a little later on. rick? >> and probably about a dozen minutes of course we'll come back and have a guest and who would be the perfect guest on a christmas eve where there is so much going on in the world of finance, politics, of course you must have guessed it. ir
maybe greece, i guess, would take number one. >> we do know that the u.s. spends a larger percentage of its gdp on health care than any of the other developed nations by a fairly significant amount. so really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue, and we should be focused on that, i think, much more than the federal government's portion of it. and in this case where you have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to health care is taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending equals medicare costs. and, again, as somebody who actually ran the program, i'm not assuming that. >> do you want to do that one? sure. >> david, this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this: what scoreable savings proposals does aarp support for medicare beyond just better care coordination? does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and b cost sharing or medty gap reforms or anything else? >> well, i think it's important to remind every
of not becoming greece or getting out of debt. this won't affect the debt situation. >> sort of hats off, wink, wink. >> the president told "meet the press" they hope to get a deal condon in the next 48 hours. >>> police say a guy broke into a woman's home and drove her to the bank of america branch where she worked. she triggered an alarm but the suspect escaped before police arrived. it took the bomb squad three hours to remove the device from her neck. she did escape unharmed luckily. >> a best friend becomes a hero after rescuing a boy who fell through the ice in iowa. they were walking on a lake when the ice gave way, sending 11-year-old ashton eckenrod into the water. >> i thought i was going to die from it. and just not see my family any more. he didn't say anything. he was just leak freaking out. i didn't know what to do so he just grabbed my hand. >> his 10-year-old friend managed to slide across the ice and pull him back out. they are both doing just fine. >>> and think you are neurotic? that could be a good thing, you guys. >> thank good glance and you came down the hall and wouldn'
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)